Mid June

22 Jun

*sigh* i’ll lay my hands on a better camera soon, meanwhile there’s a fog on the lens.

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Ornithogalum saundersiae, an explosion in glowing blue-green.

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and the same in its situation, which is another of the new beds i’m creating where the lawn was. It’s planted with waifs and strays from the greenhouse, there’s no great plan to it. It’s been very dry here recently as you can tell. That’s ok, it suits most of the plants i’ve placed in this particular bed.

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This bamboo selection, Phyllostachys vivax ‘Aureocaulis’, is growing like mad in its third year with me, typical bamboo behaviour there. It doesn’t seem to be much of a spreader – so far.

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Two aloes coming into flower. To the best of my knowledge, aloes tend to flower in the cooler months in their warmer natural environments. I have no idea how they figure out what the hell to do in my climate. I’m pleased enough for them to be alive, let alone in flower.

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Opium poppy. These things are bordering on being weeds, the way they will set roots down anywhere. I wish the peony flowered strains I have grown in the past were such prolific self-seeders. They were spectacular.

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Here are a couple of bona fide annual weeds, Rosebay Willowherb (epilobium angustifolium) which goes crazy at the time of year, and Hairy Bittercress (cardamine hirsuta), a year round annoyance.

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Paulownia tomentosa

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Plenty of blooms on brugmansia ‘Maya’. I would bring it into the house for a couple of nights to see if I could live with the perfume without getting a headache, but there’s red spider mite in there and angels’ trumpets are martyrs for those critters.

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I’ve posted before about this combination but it’s worth doing so again. Glaucous, scarlet and black together. You can tell that they are drought tolerant. The cerinthe grows much more upright under the roof of the desert bed. There’s not much soil in that bed. They’re growing in a mix of at least three quarters gravel, a little sand and the rest is coarse, twiggy compost I brewed up myself and added in thin layers in amongst the rock.

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3 Responses to “Mid June”

  1. Becca June 22, 2014 at 6:13 pm #

    Love the poppies. I wish I could grow them but I’ve only been successful with neon-orange california poppies. Today we have a slime-mold in the garden. The internet says they’re basically beneficial but…ew.

    • thechthonianlife June 22, 2014 at 11:28 pm #

      Slime mold? I’ve pulled up thousands of epilobium but never had to slop about in living, growing slime. Do you ever read Danger Garden? She had a bear in her garden last week. I’m quite happy with Little England and its harmless, inconsequential flora and fauna.

      • Becca June 25, 2014 at 9:24 pm #

        I do read Danger Garden! The slime mold was not as impressive as a bear, it’s true. It is always interesting to meet a new denizen of the garden, however, especially when it was probably there all along coexisting happily with the vertebrates. Nevertheless, I scraped it up and threw it out–given that the house is on the market, I didn’t think it was adding to the ambience. The most dangerous things in our garden are the occasional black widows.

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